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Texas Caviar Recipe

Texas Caviar Recipe


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Ingredients

  • One 15-ounce can black beans, rinsed of juice
  • One 15-ounce can black-eyed peas, rinsed of juice
  • One 15-ounce can red kidney beans, rinsed of juice
  • 1 small jar chopped pimentos, juice included
  • 1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced, green part only
  • 1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ bunch parsley, chopped
  • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
  • 1 can of Rotel with green chilies
  • 1 cup Paul Newman Balsamic Vinaigrette
  • 1 green (or red) bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves fresh garlic, pressed or minced
  • 1 can corn kernels (optional)
  • 1 avocado, diced (optional)
  • Fresh jalapeños, diced (optional)
  • Pita chips, Fritos, or tortilla chips, for serving

Directions

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and stir very well. Refrigerate for at least 4-6 hours, preferably overnight, in a sealed or covered container. The longer it sits; the better it gets. Serve with pita chips, large Fritos, or tortilla chips.


Texas Caviar

Always popular at a party, Texas Caviar (with its black-eyed peas) will make for good fortune for the coming year if eaten on New Year's Day. Be sure your peas, onion and celery contain as little water as possible. Texas Caviar is chunky -- not soupy.

  1. Drain peas, rinse with cold water and drain again.
  2. Combine olive oil, chiles, cayenne, onion, celery, vinegar, salt and pepper, and mix well.
  3. Drain the chiles.
  4. Pour over peas and stir gently.
  5. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight.
  6. At serving time, add chopped tomatoes and cilantro, and stir gently to mix.
  7. Serve with tortilla chips.

Note: I love cooking fresh/frozen black eyed peas. They taste way better than black-eyed peas from a can. From Patricia Mitchell's article on blackeyed pea recipes.

Recipe editor Patricia Mitchell

Texas Cooking

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Texas Caviar

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With as many variations as salsa, Texas Caviar is a classic dip in the Lone Star State. To some, it’s not complete without a good dousing of bottled Italian dressing, but we forgo that and let the pickled jalapeños, roasted corn, and fresh dressing do the talking. Leftovers can be used to jazz up scrambled eggs or broiled fish.

Game plan: The dip can be made up to 2 days in advance and refrigerated in a covered container.

Store-bought pickled jalapeños would work fine in this recipe, or you could make your own.


Texas Caviar

Fresh, zesty corn salad with beans, bell peppers and jalapenos – hello beautiful! Serve on the side of grilled meats and fish, or heaped on top of burgers and crostini! It’s our favorite summer side and makes a delicious dip with tortilla chips, too!

I’ve never been one for fancy things, but this is my kind of caviar! Colorful and zesty, with fresh bell peppers, corn, onions and jalapenos, it’s a real favorite with our Austin friends. This one is a bit more cowboy boots than couture, and that’s just the way we like it. We’re Texans, after all!

Anyone can enjoy this salad with a spiffy name, though… and they can enjoy it in a variety of ways! We love it served on the side of grilled meats and fish. You can also heap it on top of juicy burgers for a spicy Southwestern spin. Or, scoop it onto crostini for a pretty, easy appetizer.

However you dish up this delicious corn salad, you can’t go wrong! With summer’s beautiful bounty, now is the perfect time to toss together this fresh, vibrant salad with what’s in season. It’s a unique dish to bring to potluck parties, too. Just chuck a big spoon into the bowl and let everyone help themselves. Every scoopful is yummier than the last! We love it best with tortilla chips and frosty margaritas.

Serve a heaping bowl of this scrumptious, healthy salad alongside your next summer feast. I know you’ll love it. It’s fun to make and absolutely gaw-geous. I could just look at it all day… but I’d rather dig in!


How to Make Texas Caviar

On New Year’s Day superstitious Texans take out a symbolic insurance policy by helping themselves to a heap of black-eyed peas—a practice that, according to tradition, guarantees one lucky day for each pea consumed. No one knows for certain how this ritual started, but one theory is rooted in horticulture: When planted, the legume replenishes the nitrogen content of soil and improves growth conditions, and thus the pea can be held responsible for the fortune of bountiful crops. To ensure prosperity, many Southerners eat the cowpeas hopping John—style—boiled with a ham hock and served over rice—but a thoroughly native way to get them down is to polish off a bowl of Texas caviar. Helen Corbitt, who reigned as Neiman Marcus’s head chef for seventeen years, invented the dish in 1940, when she was asked to write a menu using only Texas products. At a loss for an acceptable recipe starring the peas that she admittedly didn’t like, she decided to pickle them in oil and vinegar with garlic and onions and unwittingly produced what would become one of her most well-known creations (it was so popular that Neiman Marcus later canned and sold it in stores). Modern variations of the dish now feature diced green bell peppers, corn, and cilantro, but this is her original recipe. Best of luck!

Recipe: Pickled Black-eyed Peas

2 fifteen-ounce cans cooked black-eyed peas 1 cup salad oil (modern palates may prefer less oil start with 1/4 cup and add more to taste) 1/4 cup wine vinegar or more, to taste 1 whole garlic clove 1/4 cup thinly sliced onion 1/2 teaspoon salt cracked or freshly ground black pepper

Drain liquid from the peas. Place peas in a bowl, add remaining ingredients, and mix thoroughly. Store in a glass jar in refrigerator and remove garlic bud after one day. Store at least two days and up to two weeks before eating. You’ll need a plate and fork for these.


About Texas Caviar:

Texas Caviar was created in Texas in the 1940’s by a woman named Helen Corbitt. She first served it on New Year’s Eve at the Houston Country Club. Later it was served at the Driskill Hotel in Austin, where it was given the name, “Texas Caviar” (meant to be funny as a comparison to the more expensive fish roe caviar). It’s also called, “Cowboy Caviar.”

This dish is anchored by having beans as the main ingredient- most notably black eyed peas as a good luck ingredient for the New Year. Some people like to use black beans in place of black eyed peas. Corn and chiles are also added in. It’s all tossed in a tangy dressing, which gives the dip a sweet “pickled” flavor.


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Related Video

Be the first to review this recipe

You can rate this recipe by giving it a score of one, two, three, or four forks, which will be averaged out with other cooks' ratings. If you like, you can also share your specific comments, positive or negative - as well as any tips or substitutions - in the written review space.

Epicurious Links

Condé Nast

Legal Notice

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved.

Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated as of 1/1/21) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated as of 1/1/21).

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast.


Texas caviar

Back when I first lived in New York, finding black-eyed peas was a challenge. While I do enjoy them year-round, it was around New Year’s Day that I became most concerned about their elusive nature.

One of the first posts I published on this site described these struggles, and as was common back in the day, I included two recipes. While there’s nothing wrong with sharing more than one recipe, in my opinion, the search engines feel differently, so I’ve decided to take the Texas caviar recipe that was on that post and give it its own home.

In fact, the initial Texas caviar recipe I posted isn’t even one that I make any longer, as I’ve made adjustments to my method over the years. Ironically, the original recipe I used came from a New York restaurant. But as I’ve evolved in my cooking, the recipe has grown with me, so I share the version I prepare now with you.

For those who were familiar with the old recipe, I’ve taken away the Worcestershire and now use red bell peppers instead of yellow as the red ones are easier to find. I swapped red onions for scallions, use grape tomatoes instead of canned ones, and have added a hit of ground cumin, as well.

The result is a refreshing dip (or side dish) that pairs well with barbecue, burgers, tortilla chips, or even queso. And while it’s welcome on New Year’s Day for that boost of good fortune, I find that it makes a fine accompaniment all year round.

—————
Would you like more Homesick Texan? Well, I’ve started offering additional recipes for paid subscribers to help with the costs of running the site. While I’m not taking anything away, if you’d like to support Homesick Texan and have access to exclusive, never-seen-before subscriber-only posts, please consider becoming a member annual subscriptions are as low as $25. Thank you for reading, your consideration, and your support!
—————


(17 votes, average: 4.41 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 8 1 x
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

This Texas caviar (Cowboy caviar) will have everyone crowded around the bowl! It’s full of big, zesty flavor and perfect for parties and cookouts.

Ingredients

For the vegetables

  • 2 15-ounce cans black eyed peas (or 3 cups cooked)
  • 15 -ounce can black beans (or 1 1/2 cups cooked)
  • 1 15-ounce can corn (or 1 1/2 cups frozen and thawed)
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 3 green onions
  • 1 medium jalapeno, seeded (optional)
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

For the dressing

  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  1. Drain and rinse the beans and corn. . Chop the cherry tomatoes. Thinly slice the green onions. Seed and dice the jalapeno pepper. Chop the cilantro.
  2. Add all the vegetables and beans to a bowl. Mix with the kosher salt.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the vinegar, sugar, garlic powder, and cumin. Gradually whisk in the olive oil. Pour the dressing over the vegetables and mix to combine.
  4. Eat immediately, or refrigerate until serving (it tastes even better after allowing to marinade 30 minutes or longer). Serve with chips for dipping.

Keywords: Texas caviar, Cowboy caviar

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