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5 Tips From a First Date at Rebel House

5 Tips From a First Date at Rebel House


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We all know that weird combination of nervous, anxious, nauseated, and kind of sweaty that truly make them like no other.

It’s new, it’s fun, it’s potentially traumatizing, but one thing you can always bet on for a first date is that you won’t eat anything beforehand, because who has room for french fries or two double cheeseburgers with extra pickles when you’ve got all those butterflies in your stomach?

But now the movie’s over. All the explosions and PG-13 makeout scenes did a good job of hiding your tummy-rumblies in the dark. It’s quiet in the parking lot, and your date asks if you’re hungry.

Hungry? Me? Ha, I filter feed! But I guess if you’re hungry… I could, like, totally eat something (everything).

This exchange feels especially familiar to me, because it’s a true story (except those makeout scenes were totally not PG-13. Thanks, Wolf of Wall Street). After leaving the theater red-faced, my date suggested we go to some place he knew called Rebel House. All I needed to know was that they sold food and accepted U.S. dollars, so off we went.

Because we drove separately (and somehow I ended up ahead of my date), I ended up passing Rebel House the first time I drove by. It’s just obscure enough to pass, and just obvious enough to say to yourself “Oh, there it went,” as you’re passing it.

Once you make a U-turn at the next light and pull into the small, dark parking lot to the left of the bar, make sure to stumble while your date helps you out. Bonus points if you try to laugh it off and snort — wait, just me? Awesome.

My first impression of Rebel House was that it must be pretty popular, since it was a Tuesday night at about 9:00 p.m. and all the tables were full. A cozy place, lots of color, lots of interesting things to look at. We sat at the bar and got a drink each. He got something strong and manly, and I got the fruitiest and weakest thing I could find on the menu. The drinks at Rebel House change daily. There’s even ‘Bartender Thursdays’ where you tell the bartender what you like and they take the reins in crafting your cocktail.

Quiet Storm: Orange Vodka, fresh squeezed lime juice, Pecan Simple Malbec Floater. PC: Rebel House

For all the people in the restaurant at the time, it was quiet enough to carry a conversation, rife with slightly awkward pauses and a painfully long story about a rubber band. Don’t ask.

Tip #1: Dainty drinks aren’t plentiful so lightweights beware.

Within minutes of our order, we received a large bowl of the house Brussels sprouts ($9) that my devoutly Jewish date was pretending weren’t made with ham. Sweet, salty, nice texture. I’d never tried them before, but I was pleasantly surprised by how tasty they were. The portion was great for sharing and they went nicely with that night’s popcorn (free) — the Rebel House version of bar nuts, a different flavor each night — which I didn’t eat because it was honey-mustard flavored and, though delicious, made for breath that smelled like vinegar. I know this, because my date did not. We were sitting close.

Tip #2: Ask if your date keeps Kosher before you opt for anything pig ridden.

Chef’s Last Meal: charcuterie, assorted cheese, pickles, seasonal accompaniments, breads ($24). PC: Rebel House

Tip #3: Honey-mustard = vinegar breath

One thing that stands out particularly was the point in our date when one of the bartenders set a drink in front of each of us—his own invention—because it seemed to him like we “had a thing.” I don’t remember much about the drink, except that it was very heavy on the rosemary. That could have been an accident, or the bartender could have noticed my date’s fondness for the popcorn and come to my rescue. Either way, I appreciated the gesture, and add points for creativity.

Tip #4: Creativity should be acknowledged through a nice tip—especially when your bartender saves you from a vinegar kiss.

Southern Gentleman Burger: Pimento cheese, collard greens, Irish bacon, pickled tomatoes (Chef’s Burger of the Day – price varies). PC: Rebel House

Drinks for two and those Brussels were about $30 before tip, which is just about right for a first date. Meal over and first date talk about the three people we knew in common exhausted, he walked me to my car, where I noticed that the parking lot was conveniently dark and secluded and made for a good makeout spot (another big plus for this place).

Tip #5: A dark restaurant parking lot is way more romantic than outside my dorm with roomates spying out the window. Beggars can’t be choosers.

Because this is not a Nicholas Sparks novel, that was both the first and last date. But, I will forever — and by forever, I mean at least for the next year or so until the memory eventually fades — remember the lovely time, punctuated with creative drinks, good food, and warm atmosphere, my charming date and I had at Rebel House.

Location: 297 E Palmetto Park Rd, Boca Raton, FL 33432
Hours of Operation:

Mon – Wed: 5:00 pm – 12:00 am Thu – Fri: 5:00 pm – 2:00 am Sat: 11:00 am – 3:00 pm, 5:00 pm – 2:00 am Sun: 11:00 am – 3:00 pm, 5:00 pm – 10:00 pm

The post 5 Tips From a First Date at Rebel House appeared first on Spoon University.


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."


5 Tips For the First Time You Leave Your Baby Overnight

There are moms who have never spent a night away from their babies, but for most of us the need to do so eventually arises, whether for work or a much needed getaway with our spouses. There's no right or wrong answer as to when it's okay to first spend a night away from your baby, but when the time comes for that first overnight separation, there is some sage advice to follow from the Circle of Moms community.

1. Have a Sitter Come to You

The less you have to interrupt your baby's schedule during your trip, the more likely it will go smoothly. That's why Nancy T. chooses to have the babysitter come to her house: " I just left my daughter overnight this past weekend to celebrate my anniversary. I had my mom come and babysit at my place so that my daughter's routine would stay the same."

Another benefit to keeping your little one at home is that you don't have to worry about the hassle of packing, or of forgetting some essential item. Renee T. prepared everything she could think of for the first time her parents kept her baby overnight, and ultimately decided to have them come to her house so they would have everything they might need .

2. Stick With Family

Several moms in the Circle of Moms community recommend using very close family to watch your baby overnight. If your parents or in-laws are able, they often make a great choice for the first sitter your baby knows. Nancy T.'s mom came over a few times before the trip to "run through the night time routine" and help her baby feel comfortable with a different person putting her to bed.

The trust that you have in your family member will mean less worry for you. For Megan F., although the first time was tough, she now feels very comfortable leaving her little one with grandma: "remember they are grandparents, so they have done this before."

3. Write Down Essentials

Even if your sitter comes to you, there are some necessary preparations before your trip – starting with paperwork. Bev R. suggests writing down the important information about your baby's routine: "Let them know the baby's schedule, how to put her to sleep. Leave a written note so that they may be able to refer to it."

Another essential paperwork item is a medical consent form, along with detailed information about where to go if there is medical emergency. These papers should include emergency phone numbers as well. "With all hope it never gets used but they need to have the power," says Bethanie S. (The website About.com has a free form that you can use, with spaces for each child's medical history, insurance info, emergency numbers, and your signed consent. Download it here).

4. Leave a Comfort Item

In addition to the practical items and paperwork, Cherie has a tip from her experience working in a daycare center, and that is leaving your baby with a huggable item you've infused with your smell: "We used to tell the moms to sleep in a t-shirt and bring it with them so we could comfort the baby with the moms smell. It seemed to work well."

5. Ditch the Guilt

This last tip is easier said than done: Try not to worry. Make the most of your time off and get the one thing you probably need most: Sleep! Melissa M. found that even one night away gave her a much-needed re-charge: "Even though it was only for one night, we had a great time. I think the best part was being able to sleep in for the first time."

Several moms agree that your relationship with your partner can benefit from an occasional night off from parenting. Circle of Moms member Holly started scheduling weekends with the grandparents when her daughter was three months-old, and found it was the key to maintaining her marriage. H ubby and I needed a date night. Our marriage wasn't doing so well at that point, but we learned how to communicate and we're great now!"

Don't be surprised if your baby isn't really fazed at all by a night or two away from you. It doesn't mean that he doesn't miss or need you, it just means that your planning, preparation and great choice of a caregiver worked! Anna B. had her mom stay with her son so that she and her husband could have some time together right after he returned from deployment: "He hardly knew I was gone. He woke up once in the night, as was usual, but my mom said she just took him downstairs and played with him for an hour till he feel back to sleep, which he must have known was different, but he did fine. Mostly, I've noticed my kids handle the separation a lot better than I expect, especially when I leave them with grandparents who are so much fun."



Comments:

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  2. Tohy

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  3. Native American

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  5. Eliaures

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  6. Dulkree

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